datapreservation.usgs.gov
National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program

NGGDPP Grant Opportunity Announced - proposals due February 8, 2016

The 2016 National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program (NGGDPP) grant opportunity is open to State geological organizations or universities on the behalf of geological surveys (for surveys that are organized under a university system) to submit proposals describing projects focused on the preservation of unique geoscience materials. Please visit grants.gov to find the Program Announcement information by using number: G16AS00009 (direct link: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html?keywords=G16AS00009). Proposals are due by February 8, 2016.

Please read the Program Announcement carefully. Input from the state geological contacts, AASG, and proposal panel review members has been used to significantly modify this Program Announcement to enable greater flexibility for tackling unique data preservation activities. 

View presentation slides provided during virtual meetings conducted January 6 and 11, 2016.

Questions asked during information sessions

Q: Can we use sub-contractors to do some of the data preservation work?
A: Yes. In the proposal, provide an estimated cost of employing the subcontractor. Explain the subcontractor's duties and qualifications and skills. It is understandable that the subcontractor may not be hired until the award is granted and data preservation work commences.

Q: It seems that NGGDPP has focused on digitization. Is it acceptable to seek funding for materials to preserve collections, for example shelving units or map protection sleeves and folders?
A: Yes. States may seek funding for materials to preserve physical collections.

Q: In the new proposal format, may States seek funding to work on multiple collections? Program Announcement seeks projects or singular data preservation activities. May separate data preservation tasks be included in the proposal?
A: Yes. States may seek funding for multiple activities. Cohesiveness among the proposed tasks is encouraged. A strong proposal should include justification why separate activities are being proposed. For example, small collections may not require as much work and therefore, multiple collections may be preserved in one year.

Q: Can we submit more than one proposal?
A: No. A state geological survey or university representing a state geological survey may submit only one proposal per grant opportunity.

Q: For required metadata field "DataType", where do I find the controlled vocabulary to use for keywords? Do I have to use specific keywords?
A: Initially, a list of keywords was made available for states to use to describe their samples. However, many other keywords were introduced to National Digital Catalog. Suggested keywords are available in the Metadata Preparation Guide. At this time, states can use keywords of their choosing that are appropriate to describe their samples.

Q: Why do metadata used to describe collections differ from metadata used to describe samples?
A: When the NGGDPP was implemented, a working group decided upon metadata elements used to describe a collection. These elements are optional and include general information such as description, size, expected growth of the collection. Metadata describing the samples within a collection follow the NGGDPP metadata schema. The NGGDPP schema includes 7 required fields and 6 optional fields, which are described in Metadata Preparation Guide.

Q: Do all documents have to be submitted in one file?
A: Please follow instructions for proposal submission on the grants.gov website. We recommend that all documents be submitted in one package for ease of tracking all information.